Marian’s Wildlife Blog – October 2017

Carolina Wren by Doug Pederson

Can there be any doubt now that climate change is affecting the United States dramatically? Its effects are felt strongly in the number and intensity of hurricanes forming in the Atlantic and hitting Texas, Florida, the Caribbean, and Puerto Rico. The number and severity of these hurricanes come about as a result of the warming of sea temperatures. Climate change is also seen in shifts in species populations seen right here in Westford.

There have been shifts in several bird species that are probably due to climate change. In the past fifty years, several species of “southern” birds have come north into New England. Among these are the Northern Cardinal, the Tufted Titmouse, Northern Mockingbird, and most recently, the Carolina Wren and the Red-bellied Woodpecker. All of these species are still seen in the south, but they have expanded their ranges into New England. This is probably in response to our less severe average winter temperatures. Some birds, such as the American Robin and the Eastern Bluebird, which used to be migratory, are now year-round residents. These species are able to shift their diet from insects and worms in the summer to berries in the winter. These are all native species that are welcome here.

But some effects of climate change on species are not so welcome….Continue reading

Upcoming Events

You can always check our upcoming events from the News and Events page. Here is a current list:

Date/Time Event
Saturday, December 2, 2017
9:00 am - 10:30 am

Jarvis Way Loop Trail


Take a late fall hike on trails near Griffin Road with Trust Director Rich Strazdas. We will explore the loop around Jarvis Way and, if time permits, go east toward the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail until we reach the large blowdown field, and then explore the trails from the end of Polar Bear Drive.
Wear sturdy footwear appropriate for the weather.
Park along Jarvis Way by the trail marker between #7 and #13 (Google erroneously insists it’s #17).
Sociable dogs on leash are welcome.

For further info, call Rich at 978-692-2057

Trails near Griffin Rd


Location: Jarvis Way Trail Loop, Westford MA

(click event name to see full details, including directions, if available)

Saturday, January 6, 2018
9:00 am - 10:30 am

Emmet Land from Trailside Way Hike


Enjoy the beauty of the Emmet Conservation Land in the Silent Season with Trust member Kate Hollister.  Sociable dogs on leash are welcome.  Be prepared for snow. Park at the end of Trailside Way, off Powers Rd, in the town parking area off the cul-de-sac.

Walks are free of charge, no sign up required.

For further information, call Kate at 978-392-6802

 


Location: Trailside Way (Town Parking Area), Westford MA

(click event name to see full details, including directions, if available)

Marian’s Wildlife Blog – September 2017

Pileated Woodpecker by Doug Pederson

Now that fall is here, have you got your bird feeders up and running again? Or maybe you feed birds all summer long. In either case, its both personally gratifying and  valuable to science to keep records of the birds you see at your feeders and in your yard. We hope you will send your records to Westford Wildlife Watch of course, and also you may enjoy joining Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Project Feeder Watch. If you join the approximately 300 Massachusetts residents who are already Project Feeder Watch reporters, you can send in your reports online, see what other reporters are observing, and help out the cause of citizen science.

Checking the Feeder Watch website, one can see the birds which were reported from all states and years. For the Massachusetts 2016-2017 season, we can see that 90 species of birds were reported. Most common birds reported were the usual suspects, Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, Blue Jay, Dark-eyed Junco, Downy Woodpecker, Mourning Dove, Northern Cardinal and White-breasted Nuthatch. These resident birds were reported in 80-90% of sites during the entire season. Some of these birds, such as Blue Jay and Black-capped Chickadee represent a welcome come-back from West Nile virus which ravaged their populations a few years ago. American Crow, that was hit hardest by the virus, has had a much slower come-back, and is still only seen at about 25% of sites.

Some statistics are surprising. For instance,   read more…

Marian’s Wildlife Blog – August 2017

Black capped Chickadee by Doug Pederson

Do you have a large glass window or slider at your house? If so, chances are you have seen a bird strike that glass at some time. If the bird is lucky, it will just stun itself, perhaps need a few minutes to “come to” and then fly off. Sometimes, though, the bird is killed by the window strike. Living Bird, a publication of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, reported on this problem in an article titled “Glass Action for Birds”, in its winter 2014 edition. It has been estimated that up to a billion birds are killed each year by window collisions in the United States alone.

Scott Loss of Oklahoma State University has done bird strike research for the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He found, surprisingly, that the majority of annual bird deaths occur at residential and low-rise structures. The average family residence kills one to three birds a year. Loss found that six species seem to die of glass strikes most commonly: Ruby-throated hummingbirds, brown creepers, ovenbirds, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, gray catbirds, and black and white warblers. It seems that these long-distance migrants may be less familiar with the structures in areas they pass through on migration. I notice that at my house, however, the birds mostly likely to strike the glass are mourning doves, downy woodpeckers, chickadees and titmice. It seems that they do this when they are flying in panic to avoid a hawk predator.   read more….