Upcoming Events

You can always check our upcoming events from the News and Events page. Here is a current list:

Date/Time Event
Saturday, December 3, 2016
9:00 am - 10:30 am

Stepinski Conservation Land Hike


img_5113Join Westford Conservation Trust Director Lenny Palmer for a walk on the wild side of the Stony Brook Conservation Land, across the brook from East Boston Camps.

Park at the American Legion Fields off River Street.

Visit this 110-acre property acquired by Westford in 2008, with 1.6 miles of shoreline, mixed forest, a town well, and an undeveloped riparian ecosystem. Wave to the hikers on the Stony Brook Trail across the brook.

Sociable dogs on leash are welcome. Walk is free of charge, and no sign-up is required.

For more information call Lenny at 978-392-9876

stepinski

 

 

 

 


Location: Near 13 River St, Graniteville – American Legion Fields, Westford MA

(click event name to see full details, including directions, if available)

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Annual Meeting on November 3

Westford Conservation Trust – Annual Meeting

American Beaver

When: Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 7pm

Where: Parish Center for the Arts (PCA), 10 Lincoln St, Westford, MA 01886

Guest Speaker: Mike Callahan, Beaver Solutions

Our guest speaker this year will be Western MA based Beaver Solutions founder Mike Callahan. Mike will talk about beaver behavior and biology and the latest in beaver management techniques. Questions from the audience will be encouraged! Come join us to learn more about these amazing creatures and some ideas about working together in resolving beaver/human conflicts.

Business Meeting – A short trust annual business meeting will be held from 7:00-7:30pm. Our guest speaker will follow this brief business meeting. Refreshments will also be served. Hope to see you there!


Here’s the ‘tail’ of a ‘beaver splash’

A Beaver’s Tail (wdfw.wa.gov)
The tail of a large beaver may be 15 inches long and 6 inches wide. It is covered with leathery scales and sparse, coarse hairs.The beaver’s tail has important uses both in the water and on land. In the water, the animal uses its flexible tail as a four-way rudder.

When diving after being frightened, a beaver loudly slaps the water with its tail; the sound warns all beavers in the vicinity that danger is near, and perhaps serves to frighten potential predators.

On land, the tail acts as a prop when a beaver is sitting or standing upright. It also serves as a counterbalance and support when a beaver is walking on its hind legs while carrying building materials with its teeth, front legs, and paws. Contrary to common belief, beavers do not use their tails to plaster mud on their dams.

The tail stores fat, and because it is nearly hairless, releases body heat, helping the beaver to regulate its body temperature.

 

beaverlodge2lily-pond

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Wildlife Watch, September 2016 by Marian Harman

Marian’s Wildlife Watch Blog

Farmland is disappearing in Massachusetts. In response to open hill-orchard_marian-harmanspace loss, about ten years ago, the Mass Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, developed a continually updated document titled the Smart Growth Tool Kit. The Tool Kit website states, “We are losing agricultural lands and farming opportunities at an alarming rate….over 16,000 acres of open space is developed and lost in Massachusetts each year.” To try to stem the tide of farmland loss, the Mass Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) established the Agricultural Preservation Restriction (APR) program in 1979. It was a first-in-the-nation model for many other states. The MDAR website states, “the primary purpose of the APR program is to preserve and protect agricultural land, including designated farmland soils, which are a finite natural resource, from being built upon for non-agricultural purposes or used for any activity detrimental to agriculture, and to maintain APR land values at a level that can be supported by the land’s agricultural uses and potential.”

The APR program works by paying farmers the difference between the full market value of their land and the agricultural value of the land. In that way, the landowner retains ownership of the land, but cannot sell the land for anything but agriculture. The program has worked well. It has protected 800 farms and 68,000 acres in Massachusetts.  read more

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail

Wildlife Watch by Marian Harman

Marian’s Wildlife Watch Blog

Grey Catbird_Doug Pederson

Grey Catbird – Doug Pederson

How are the birds doing in North America?

To answer that question, the North American Bird Conservation Initiative, a consortium of forty conservation organizations and government agencies has just published an important new document titled “The State of North America’s Birds”. More than 350 species of our migratory birds, such as the gray catbird, Baltimore oriole, and the wood thrush pass between Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The report combined citizen science bird data, collected on platforms such as e-Bird, to come up with the 2016 status report on the birds of all three countries, a total of 1,154 species.

The reports’ findings are alarming. It placed 37% of North American birds on a Watch List for Species in Urgent Need of Conservation. For some habitats birds are even more imperiled.  For instance, 57% of ocean birds are on the Watch List. Birds of tropical forests, coasts, arid lands and grasslands are also in steep decline. For these habitats, up to 56% of bird species are in decline. In other habitats, such as temperate forests, tundra, wetlands, and boreal forests, up to 27% of bird species are on the Watch List. Westford is a temperate forest habitat, but our migratory birds spend the winter in the tropical forest.  read more….

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusmail